Summer Play

Summer Play

Lots of summer, flower and garden related activities this week after a bit of interest in the flowers I rescued from an overgrown area at school…

Rescued flowers from the undergrowth - from Rachel (",)

Here are some of the things we’ve enjoyed…

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Citrus Soup in the Water Tray

Lemons, limes and oranges. Such a lovely fruity smell! This was really popular…

Citrus soup in the water tray - from Rachel (",)

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Flower Inspired Transient Art

… with scarf hangers and loose parts (Thanks Heather Ryan over on Twitter, for the scarf hanger idea, that you shared over a year ago!). My hubby removed the hooks for me…

Flower inspired transient art - from Rachel (",)

 

Small World Play

Birds and butterflies…

Birds and butterflies in the small world area - from Rachel (",)

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Sand Patterns

Sand, early handwriting pattern cards, tools and one of the set of sensory trays from TTS…

Patterns in the sand (FREE early handwriting pattern cards) from Rachel (",)

Download the early handwriting pattern cards here: Mark making Pattern Cards from Rachel (“,)

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Summer Inspired Number & Pattern Play 

Summer inspired number and pattern play - from Rachel (",)

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Real Leaves on the Light Panel

Real leaves on the light panel - from Rachel (",)

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Wrapping Scarf Hangers

… with pipe-cleaners & beads. This was tricky for their little fingers, so I was pleased they took up the challenge…

Fine motor work with scarf hangers, pipe cleaners and beads - from Rachel (",)

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Fine Motor Work with DIY Resources

Fine motor play with some DIY resources - from Rachel (",)

Nuts and Bolts

Nuts and bolts play from Rachel (",)

Natural Geoboards

Fine motor in with the natural geoboards- from Rachel (",)

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Play Dough and Loose Parts

I’ve had these lids for years, but the idea to use them with dough came from montessori_restore on Instagram. Love her work!

Play dough and loose parts - from Rachel (",)

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Pictures on the OHP

Shapes on the OHP - from Rachel (",)

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Bean Arch

Our beans are growing nicely – although the snails are trying to eat them…

Growing beans - from Rachel (",)

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Thanks for reading!

Love having fresh flowers in the classroom - from Rachel (",)

Don’t forget that you can also find me on FacebookInstagramTwitter &  Pinterest

Would love you to come & say hello! 🙂 

– Rachel (“,)

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16 Comments

  1. Fabulous ideas once again – thank you! 🙂

    Reply
    • You’re welcome, Sharon!
      Thanks for the lovely comment 🙂

      Reply
  2. Love all your ideas! Just wish I had so many lovely resources. If you put a thick layer of vaseline around the top of your plant pots the snails won’t be able to get to the beans.

    Reply
    • Ah, thanks for the tip, Helen! I did this at home last year and they still got to them! They must be Super Snails! 😉 I should try it at school though.

      Reply
  3. Love your ideas! This past year I was a little burned out. You always inspire me and help me get my feet back under me.

    Reply
    • Ah, Chris, thank you!
      Hope you’re feeling a bit better now – this job certainly takes it out of you! x

      Reply
  4. So inviting I want to come explore. I was wondering when your students place all those wonderful things into the play dough what is the expectation afterwards regarding clean up and how does that process turn out. How long does your playdough stay useable? And what recipe for playdough do you recommend? Love your photos.

    Reply
    • Hi Sue,
      The children are trained over the year to tidy up after themselves & are brilliant at it now (I dread September when we have to start all over again). Generally what happens (once they are ‘trained’) is that they ask me (or my Teaching Assistant) to take a photo when they have created something and then they clear it away. Of course, some forget and are asked to return to the area to sort it out.
      We generally replace the dough after a week and tend to use this recipe: http://musingssahm.com/2012/02/easy-homemade-playdough-recipe/
      Hope that helps! Feel free to ask again if I haven’t been clear 🙂

      Reply
      • Thanks so much for the information and link. That recipe is very similar to one that I use too. I find adding the coloring to the liquid helps make the color very uniform when mixing it together too. Do you ever add scents to your dough? This year we had some lavender scented dough it was so soothing to play with. I don’t know who liked it more me or the children.

        Reply
        • Yes, we love adding scents – vanilla, almond, caramel, cinnamon and ginger are my favourites (sweet tooth!). I like using coconut when we have beach themed dough. There are some yummy smelling fragrances out there!

          Reply
          • Hi
            Do you use food flavourings or do you just use like pot pourri scents?

            Plus how did you husband get the hangers out of the scarf racks?

            Thanks

          • Hi Sarah!
            Food flavourings in the dough.
            My hubby used pliers and brute force to get the hangers out. He tried unscrewing them, but they just seemed to twist forever.
            🙂

  5. Your class always looks so inviting and full of choice. I was wondering if you could share what your daily schedule looks like. I am going to be teaching preschool for the first time this coming Sept. I have taught elementary but never preschool so I am trying to get as many ideas as possible to see what works for us. Our preschool is only 2 days a week for 2 hours each day so we have very limited time. We also have ages 1-5 attending together but the 1-3 years old attend with a parent so at least I have lots of adult helpers. With the ix of ages and limited time, I am trying various schedules in my head that have a mix of whole class free choice and more focused small group time. I would love to hear what you do in your class.

    Reply
    • Our children come for 15 hours a week. 20 come at the ‘beginning of the week’ (which is all day Mon/Tues & Weds morning) and 20 come at ‘the end of the week’ (Weds afternoon and all day Thurs/Fri – all day means 9am until 3pm). They are 3 & 4 years old.
      We have a pretty free day. When the children arrive, we all sit on the carpet and complete an activity together (phonics activity, story, number game etc). Then the children play all morning. The adults play with them, following the children’s lead and supporting their learning as they play. When I say adults, I mean either myself or my Teaching Assistant. The door to the garden is always open and the children can move in and outside as they wish.
      We all come together just before lunch and will do another activity before they go to eat. After lunch, we pretty much do the same as the morning.
      As the children choose what they want to do, every day is different and we never know what will happen next! I guess that’s why it’s so exhausting!
      Because they are with us all day, it means that they can continue with something in the afternoon that they started in the morning, if they wish. I love this – it’s particularly brilliant when they have started building something.
      It sounds like you have limited time, which makes things tricky!
      Also, the vast age range will make your choice of materials more difficult too. What a challenge!!

      Reply
      • Thank you so much for your reply. I appreciate that you took the time to share so much about your day. It sounds like such a wonderful experience for the kids… and teachers!

        Reply
        • I think they enjoy their day. We certainly do – usually! 😉
          Hope you manage to find something that works for you.

          Reply

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