Chinese New Year Last!

Chinese New Year Last!

These are the activities we enjoyed for Chinese New Year last year. They are very similar to activities we’ve enjoyed before…

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Chinese Restaurant

This is super popular and generally stays out for ages. I love the language that comes from it.

Chinese Restaurant from Rachel (",)

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Constructing ‘Chinese’ Buildings 

I had some amazing engineers last year. After looking through various books from the library, they decided to build ‘Chinese buildings’ (their words). One of the boys drew a picture of their building when they’d finished.

Constructing Chinese buildings - from Rachel (",)

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Chinese New Year Inspired Maths

Counting 

These numbered red and gold cups have been going strong for a few years now. Some of the children will independently count the correct number of objects into them (or at least have a try), but others would need an adult playing at the table with them to do this.

Chinese New Year inspired counting - from Rachel (",)

Invitation to Mark Make Numerals

Invitation to write Chinese numbers - from Rachel (",)

Pegging Numerals in the Correct Order

Playing with Chinese numbers - from Rachel (",)

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Water Play 

Chinese New Year inspired water play - from Rachel (",)

With added petals…

Petals added to the 'Chinese New Year' inspired water tray - from Rachel (",)

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Finger Gym

Super simple!

Picking up pom-poms with tweezers - from Rachel (",)

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Threading Chinese Dragon Tails 

Threading Chinese dragon tails - from Rachel (",)

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Red Envelopes, Pennies and Tweezers

Red envelopes, pennies and tweezers - from Rachel (",)

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Threading ‘Cherry Blossom’ 

Threading 'Cherry Blossom' - from Rachel (",)

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Chinese New Year Inspired Play Dough 

Chinese New Year inspired play dough - from Rachel (",)

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Panda Dough

More related to China than Chinese New Year – this came about after one of the boys enjoyed some panda photos in one of the books about China we looked at…

Panda dough - from Rachel (",)

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Dragon Silhouettes on the OHP

Dragon silhouettes on the OHP - from Rachel (",)

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Transient Art Blossom Trees

Transient art blossom trees on the light panel - from Rachel (",)

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Re-telling the Story of ‘The Great Race’

…through small world play. I just gather the characters from various small world sets (farm, wild animals, pets etc) for this…

Re-telling the story of 'The Great Race' through small world play... from Rachel (",)

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Chinese Dragon on the Reversible Sequin Board

He did this as a surprise for me! ❤️

Chinese dragon the reversible sequins board - from Rachel (",)

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Interest Table

Chinese New Year interest table - from Rachel (",)

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Playing with a Chinese Dragon

Playing with a Chinese dragon - from Rachel (",)

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Previous Posts

If you’d like to see what activities we’ve enjoyed in previous years, this post has a link to them all.

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Thanks for reading!

Don’t forget that you can also find me on FacebookInstagramTwitter &  Pinterest

Would love you to come & say hello! 🙂 

– Rachel (“,)

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8 Comments

  1. Once again, you have helped me expand the activities in my Transitional Kindergarten Classroom. They love picking up the “noodles” and “dumplings” with cheater chopsticks in our Lunar New Year restaurant dramatic play area. I added a light box this year to make dragon shapes with translucent geometric shapes and red bead necklaces, thanks to inspiration from your OH projector activity. I love the calligraphy idea- trying to think of something to string up the cards on an improvised laundry line, similar to your pictures. My students actually requested to “write with a brush” after watching a video of a little girl in her Chinese class, so your activity is perfect for my 4 and 5s. Happy New Year!

    Reply
    • Ah, Audrey, that’s fabulous!
      So pleased I might have inspired you in some way 🙂 x

      Reply
  2. Do you make your own playdough? I’ve been trying to find a recipe to make a white playdough that isn’t crumbly (and looks more white than off-white). I’ve attempted several recipes to use for my preschoolers with animals and white rocks and pine branches. They make winter animal habitats and look for the animal tracks in the playdough snow. But…I have yet to happen upon a great white snow dough recipe!

    Reply
    • The white ‘dough’ you see here is the hair conditioner version, which has a slightly different texture – 1 part hair conditioner to (approximately) 2 parts cornflour – you might need more cornflour, stir it in a bit at a time. It acts slightly differently to ‘normal’ play dough though.
      We’ve added white powder paint to our usual play dough recipe in the past, although it can make it a bit crumbly…

      Reply
    • I also want a white play dough recipe for my winter snow dough.

      Reply
      • In the past, we’ve added white powder paint to the flour in a normal play dough recipe – can be a bit crumbly sometimes though.

        Reply
  3. I tried that hair conditioner/cornstarch recipe last year and it was so crumbly. This year I found one that was cornstarch and canola oil. Could not get a good ratio where it was not too crumbly or too oily. I spent lots of time kneading it thinking that was the trick – but unfortunately, it was not. Thanks for your help!

    Reply
    • Yes, it can be quite crumbly. Definitely a different experience for little fingers!

      Reply

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